Great Article on Why the Left Gave Up Violence

The Washington Post has a great article on why the left gave up violence.  The two first are basicially that it is counter-productive, and that there are better ways to get change.  Te other however, is much more interesting, and worthy of much thought:

The third and most important reason for giving up violence can be found in the new makeup of the American left. Emerging out of the rubble of the 1960s, the modern left, which coalesced around George McGovern’s quixotic 1972 presidential run, effectively represented a gathering of fugitives. African Americans, Hispanics, women, gay men and lesbians, Native Americans, and workers: These long-ostracized groups, which came to replace the New Deal coalition anchored by the white working class, were the very peoples against whom violence had been done for so long. Their painful histories made them instinctively averse to, and intolerant of, political violence. Those who had survived lynchings, beatings, bombings, sexual violence, forced removals and economic exploitation were least disposed to employ them in return. In 1972, those groups were often on the far left, but they eventually became the spine of Barack Obama’s electoral coalition.

Even while the fringes of the left were drawn to violence by overwhelming frustration (not to mention FBI provocateurs), most were profoundly ambivalent, probably in major part for these reasons.

It occurs to me that the only way the right seems to have to respond to those whose claims and philosophy has been shaped in part by a family history of being at the very least at risk of being victims, is to embrace their own victim-hood — and the facts just do not support those beliefs.

This also suggests that the left might be better than we fear at reaching out to the right self-perceived victims on the basis of common “victimhood.”  At a minimum, in individual conversations, those on the left can tell stories that might create some sense of sympathy.  Of course, the sociopaths (like the Donald) will never feel any such empathy, but I simply refuse to believe that 30% are sociopaths.

And, a society built on an understanding of the risk of victimiztion would surely be a better one.

 

 

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VP Pence Rushing Home Thursday. Can We Look at the 25th Amendment and Wonder Why?

As The Hill puts it:

Pence’s office said the vice president was returning to Washington on Thursday night instead of Friday morning to attend the president’s meeting at Camp David. Those meetings are expected to focus on North Korea.  

Pence deputy chief of staff Jarrod Agen also said the vice president’s other weekend plans had been canceled in case the president needed any follow up.

Pence’s office said the vice president was returning to Washington on Thursday night instead of Friday morning to attend the president’s meeting at Camp David. Those meetings are expected to focus on North Korea.  

Pence deputy chief of staff Jarrod Agen also said the vice president’s other weekend plans had been canceled in case the president needed any follow up.

With an administration this transparent, this should explain it all, but, as the 25th Amendment says in part:

Whenever the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the office as Acting President. (Bold added; remainder of section text describes resolution process.)

So, you have to wonder about those plans, particularly since N. Korea is supposed to be cooled down.

You also have to wonder if the lack of cabinet resignations displays a support of Trump, or an awareness that the action moment is approaching, and that for cabinet members staying now makes more sense both personally and for the country.

More info and analysis on the 25th here.

 

 

 

 

Enough Already — Move on to The End Game

I am tired of hearing talking heads tell us how terrible Trump is.

The discussion has to move on to legal removal processes strategies, and how to hold accountable those Republicans who continue to enable by silence, acquiesce, or worse.  Clock on the categories for discussions by type.

 

Did Trump Spontaneously Add the Problem Words to His Charlottesville Statement?

Most of the problems in Trump Charlottesville statement come from the phrase “amny sides.”  In fact, if you watch it, here, you see you will see that the phrase, actually repeated, at the 16 second mark, is delivered very differently from the rest of the statement.

The phrase is emphasized, by tone and repetition and it is underlined by an arm wave (an old rhetorical trick).

manysides

To me, the whole thing only makes verbal and non-verbal sense as a spontaneous addition by Trump.  In other words he wanted and needed to weaken and qualify an originally more powerful statement.

Note that at the beginning, he is clearly reading something, but at this critical point he looks up, not needing to be guided by the previously drafted statement and his body argue changes.

Moreover he similarly does not look at the written statement when referencing his name and that of Obama, and when he talks of how long the hated has been going on.  It might well be that this additional dilution by time is also added personally by him.

I would urge news organizations to do all they can to get the original draft, although when you look at this in this light, it all makes sense, even without knowing the written text.

If I am right, this is an additional insight into his soul, if any were needed.

Update, August 15.  Now confirmed.

 

 

Speculation and Manafort’s Change of Lawyers

I want to draw your attention to the some specific language in the Politico story on Paul Manafort’s change of lawyers, quoting a Manafort spokesman (see especially my bold language):

A spokesman confirmed the change. “Mr. Manafort is in the process of retaining his former counsel, Miller & Chevalier, to represent him in the office of special counsel investigation. As of today, WilmerHale no longer represents Mr. Manafort,” Jason Maloni said in a statement.

Now I have absolutely no factual knowledge of the situation.

However, I can not help but notice this.  Apparently, the process of moving back representation to prior counsel was not, at least at the time of the statement, complete.  But, “as of today,” WilmerHale is out of the picture, and apparently it has become important that this is made clear immediately.

Now all the media coverage has focused on the possibility that this change reflects realization of the newly serious situation Manafort faces.  But what strikes me is the apparent speed and finality of the change — so fast that the statement is issued before the retaining of new counsel is complete.  This is in direct contrast to changes made in representation of others caught up in this scandal.  Of course, in a fast moving case, in which the prosecutor has already  shown a willinness to push hard, going even an hour without a lawyer can be very risky.

As a totally general matter, it is an open secret among lawyers that “getting off a case,” is often triggered by disagreement about testimony, or representations made by counsel to legal bodies. Sometimes this can be related to prior testimony or such representations.  More specifically often the problem is the reluctance of counsel to become embroiled in knowing (emphasis added) that testimony is false.  (One might speculate that in such situations, timing can be of the essence.)

Regardless of whether any of my speculation is accurate, you can be sure that Mueller’s staff are already going through everything they have to try to figure out where any problem might be, and to then adjust their strategy.

Not good news for any of those potentially implicated.

Note:  This post appeared initially in my access to justice blog.

 

Future Needs For Federal Agency Outstations

Yesterday, we talked about the Secret Service’s lesser urgency for a close-in outpost in Trump Tower.

Today, much less humorously, it is beginning to look like the DOJ crackdown on the media will mean that Federal Bureau of Prisons will need outstations at the New York Times and the Washington Post.

If history is any guide, that need will decline quickly.  Rather there will soon be need for a huge Bureau of Prisons outstation at Trump Tower.  While the space vacated by the Secret Service will presumably be available, I doubt it will be large enough.